Miss Felice Nonchalante suggested:

Although Novarian light games are deservedly popular among Aristasians, there is much to be said for the Arcadian parlour game. It develops social graces and improves memory and/or invention. The following is a rather charming example I found in a delightful book published in that province.

This game is played by six girls, and she who makes a mistake in it is decorated with a paper horn, a number of which must be prepared previously.

All being seated in a circle, one of them turns to her neighbour, and begins the game by saying:
“Good morning, genteel lady, always genteel. I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady, always genteel, to tell you that she owns an eagle.”

The next then turns to her neighbour and says:
“Good morning, genteel lady, always genteel. I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady, always genteel, to tell you that she owns an eagle with a golden beak.”

The next girl says:
“Good morning, genteel lady, always genteel. I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady, always genteel, to tell you that she owns an eagle with a golden beak and silver claws.”

The next says:
“Good morning, genteel lady, always genteel. I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady, always genteel, to tell you that she owns an eagle with a golden beak, silver claws and lace skin.”

The next says:
“Good morning, genteel lady, always genteel. I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady, always genteel, to tell you that she owns an eagle with a golden beak, silver claws, lace skin and diamond eyes.”

The last says:
“Good morning, genteel lady, always genteel. I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady, always genteel, to tell you that she owns an eagle with a golden beak, silver claws, lace skin, diamond eyes and purple feathers.”

The slightest mistake being punished with a paper horn, most of the heads are tolerably well decorated before the end of the game.

Miss Carina added:

My favourite game when I was young was “I Spy with My Little Eye”, which I remember playing with my mother every week while we were walking to church. This is how I learned the names of trees! An enduring favourite, though, is “I Love My Love with An A”. I am sure you know it – it goes, for example, “I love my love with an A because she is artistic; I hate her with an A because she is annoying; I love my love with a B because she is beautiful; I hate her with a B because she is bombastic” and so on. The picture of a very strange individual emerges! It can be difficult – I remember one howler: “I love my love with a J because she is dutiful.”

Parlour games are a pretty good way to break the ice when meeting new girls, or to liven things up if there is a dull patch. The advantage over board games is that they tend not to last so long; and the advantage over light games is that everyone can take part. Also they often end up with everyone laughing, because they are so silly!

This is an unusual variant of “Simone Says”, called “Fly Away”:
Everyone sits in a circle or in a half circle round the fire, each with her hands on her knees with the thumbs linked. One of the players then says: “Fly away, eagle!” and the others have to raise their hands imitating the action of flying, at the same time repeating “Fly away, eagle!” The leader then goes on, “Fly away, parrot!” or “canary” or “moth”, with the same response. Suddenly, however, she will cry, “Fly away, dog!” or name some other creature which cannot fly. Anyone who raises her hands or repeats the words is out of the game and so it goes on until everyone is out. 

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